“What’s past is prologue” —William Shakespeare, The Tempest

Posted on January 3, 2017 by Joseph Manko

I first began to focus on the need to protect our environment in the 1960’s, starting with Rachel Carson’s indictment of one particular pollutant, the pesticide DDT in her seminal work, “Silent Spring.”  As the decade of the ‘60’s proceeded, environmental protection began to focus on the local release/discharge of contaminants into the air, ground and water.  Each state dealt with these problems in a scattershot manner until the EPA was formed in 1970 to administer laws passed by Congress to be uniform – commonly called “command and control.” 

On Wednesday, October 17, 1973, the Arab-dominated Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (“OPEC”) decided to reduce the exports of the most basic transportable fossil fuel – oil - to the United States and other countries who aided Israel during the Yom Kippur.  This was commonly called the “OPEC Embargo” and exposed our national dependence on Mideast oil.  

Against this backdrop, on Monday, October 15, 1973, I left my corporate law practice and took my “Hamiltonian shot,” becoming EPA Region 3’s general counsel.  I joined the newly created EPA under Administrator Russell Train to implement, apply and enforce the new environmental statutes - the Clean Water Act (CWA–1972), Clean Air Act (CAA-1970) and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA-1969).  Instead, because of the OPEC embargo, I was processing CAA variance requests to burn wood chips in furnaces in Philadelphia and fill my gas tank on alternative weekdays.  When the embargo ended the following year, we went about achieving EPA’s mission to protect the environment and coordinate the three E’s – the economy, ecology and energy – focus on the latter would grow in importance – and argument – in the years to come.   

I left my position in October 1975 and started a private practice in environmental law and later began to teach environmental law.  Along came the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (“RCRA”), and on the eve of President-Elect Ronald Regan’s inauguration, the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (“CERCLA”).  The federal government was clearly on track to achieve its mission.

In January 1981, however, President Regan determined to “reverse” environmental protection by the federal government and return it to “state control,” welcoming to this cause a number of inexperienced, unqualified and hostile political friends to dismantle the federal program.  The result – James Watt left his Secretary of the Interior post in disgrace on October 10, 1983; EPA Administrator Anne Gorsuch resigned in disgrace on March 9, 1983; Rita Lavelle, the EPA Assistant Administrator for Hazardous Waste and Superfund, wound up serving prison time for lying to Congress; and at least one Regan appointed EPA regional administrator was thrown out of office. 

During the twenty-eight Bush/Clinton/Bush/Obama scandal free years, EPA went about its business of environmental protection, leading up to the presidential election of October 2016.  The near unanimous global and scientific recognition that climate change was happening led to efforts to reign in carbon emissions primarily from the burning of fossil fuel (coal and oil), culminating this fall in the Paris Agreement.  President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry led the successful fight to get the requisite number of countries to sign on with the United States.  Environmental protection became a global need, no longer a local problem.

And then came November 8, the election of Donald Trump. 

As he proceeded to name the people he wanted to make up his cabinet, speculation began as to whether as President-Elect he would actually activate his campaign attacks on environmental protection.  Now almost a month before his inauguration, he has actualized his campaign promises.  First, he selected Oklahoma attorney general Scott Pruitt as EPA Administrator, a climate change denier who led the attack in court on President Obama’s Clean Power Plan (the vehicle US planned to use to reduce carbon emissions from fossil fuel in fulfillment of its Paris Agreement commitment).  Second, he tapped Rex Tillerson, the CEO of ExxonMobil, the world’s largest fossil fuel producer and defendant in NY v. Exxon, to be his Secretary of State.  Third, for Energy Secretary, he has designated Texas Governor Rick Perry, the man who in his 2011 campaign famously forgot that the third federal agency he would abolish was the Department of Energy.  Finally, with these selections, he has made it abundantly clear that he meant what he said about reeling in the EPA. 

Will he succeed during his administration or will he fail in his efforts to reprise the Reagan assault.  Some of the big differences between the 1980’s and today are (1) environmental degradation is now understandably global, not just local, (2) the rest of the world is similarly impacted and is watching us, and (3) the stakes are much higher.  Will Congress permit a legislative dismantling of the statutory structure it put together over the past 45 years?  Will the myriad environmental NGOs be strong enough (and sufficiently funded) to take these attacks to court?  Will EPA be able to preserve its regulatory program to implement environmental protection?  Will the courts uphold these executive anti-environmental attack efforts or stop them?  And in that regard, who will be Trump’s selection of SCOTUS Justice #9? 

We wonder.  Many of us worry.  And all of us wait.



Comments (3) -

Donald W. Stever United States
1/3/2017 12:18:36 PM #

Very well said.  I was as section chief in DOJ with EPA as my principal client when Ronald Reagan was elected.  There is, however, one major difference in the people appointed by Reagan and those being put forward by Trump - the Department of Justice.  Reagan appointed his friend William French Smith, a very fine California lawyer, as his first Attorney General, and our colleague Carol Dinkins was appointed Assistant Attorney General for what was then called the Lands and Natural Resources Division.  Carol's experience, sound judgment, sense of humor and pragmatic common sense were a bright spot in an otherwise gloomy period for environmental protection.

Martha E Rudolph United States
1/3/2017 12:53:31 PM #

Although the promise of the return of coal jobs helped secure Trump's win, I have to believe that most Americans do not want to see EPA dismantled and environmental and health protections gone.  For now, most of the work to protect our health and environment will shift to the individual states.   And at the national level, the battle will be, still, in the courts.  Too bad.  More gets done when we can work together instead of drawing battle lines.

Dave Ullrich United States
1/4/2017 9:51:58 AM #

Don't wait.  Act.

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