I DON'T WANT TO SCARE YOU . . . BUT BE WARNED

Posted on February 7, 2011 by Stephen E. Herrmann

The Problem
In the world of environmental claims, there are numerous ways that a duty to preserve documents and particularly e-documents can arise before litigation is filed.


The Problem Becomes a Sanction
E-discovery sanctions have reached an all-time high after three decades of litigation over alleged discovery wrongdoing. “Sanctions motions and sanction awards for e-discovery violations have been trending every-upward for the last 10 years and have now reached historic highs,” according to a King & Spalding study published at 60 Duke Law Journal 789 (2010).


King & Spalding lawyers analyzed 401 cases before 2010 in which sanctions were sought and found 230 sanctions awarded, including often severe sanctions of case dismissal, adverse jury instructions and significant money awards. Sanctions of more than $5 million were ordered in five cases, and sanctions of $1 million or more were awarded in four others. Before 2009, the highest number of sanctions awarded against lawyers in a single year was five. However, 46 sanctions were awarded in 2009, the last year covered by the study.
 

Defendants and their lawyers were sanctioned for e-discovery violations nearly three times more often than plaintiffs. When sanctions were awarded, the most common misconduct was failure to preserve electronic evidence.


That is why prospective environmental litigants and their counsel must be aware of the issue. Even if the client does not realize that the duty to preserve has attached, and electronic information disappears, the client and its lawyers are subject to spoliation claims, and increasingly sanctions.
 

Pinpointing The Problem Is Not Easy
A duty to preserve represents a legal requirement to maintain relevant records for litigation. Hence, identifying the trigger of the duty to preserve is essential. The duty to preserve arises before a complaint is filed when a party reasonably should know that the evidence may be relevant to anticipated litigation. When that time occurs is anything but certain.


Unlike the paper world where documents are often maintained in central storage, in the electronic world, every employee is a file keeper. E-mails can disappear with the stroke of a key. A company’s records management system may provide for relatively short timeframes for e-mails in mailboxes to eliminate data clutter. Be aware that storage systems used for disaster recovery are periodically recycled.


So, when should environmental lawyers instruct their clients on preserving documents, and particularly e-documents, for litigation? It is not at all easy to pinpoint. But, the courts have made it increasingly clear through sanctions that lawyers must figure it out. Making it even tougher are the differing views among judges on such issues as:

 

  1. Can a prospective plaintiff or defendant have a duty to preserve if counsel has not been retained to explain the duty?
  2. Must a client’s lawyer have knowledge of a claim before a duty to preserve can be triggered?
  3. If an environmental agency is pursuing other entities in an industry but not your client, does that trigger a duty to preserve?
  4. Does a notice of violation sent by a regulatory agency represent “anticipation” of litigation.

Conclusion

I repeat -- In the world of environmental claims, there are numerous ways that a client’s duty to preserve documents, and particularly e-documents, can arise before litigation is actually filed.
 

Be careful out there!

China Points To Population Control As Climate Change Strategy

Posted on July 26, 2010 by Stephen E. Herrmann

The population issue has not received much comment when countries discuss ways to mitigate climate change and slow down global warming, according to Zhao Baige, Vice Minister of National Population and Family Planning Commission of China (NPFPC).

 

 

“Dealing with climate change is not simply an issue of CO2 emission reduction but a comprehensive challenge involving political, economic, social, cultural and ecological issues, and the population concern fits right into the picture,” said Zhao.

 

 

Zhao cites studies that link population growth with emissions and the effect of climate change, saying:

 

“Calculations of the contribution of population growth to emissions growth globally produce a consistent finding that most of past population growth has been responsible for between 40 percent and 60 percent of emissions growth,” citing the 2009 State of World Population report, released earlier by the UN Population Fund.

 

 

Although China’s family planning policy has received criticism over the past three decades, Zhao said that China’s population program has made a great historic contribution to the well-being of China’s society.

 

 

As a result of the family planning policy, China has seen 400 million fewer births, which has resulted in 18 million fewer tons of CO2 emissions a year, Zhao said. The UN report projected that if the global population would remain 8 billion by the year 2050 instead of a little more than 9 billion according to medium-growth scenario, “it might result in 1 billion to 2 billion fewer tons of carbon emissions.”

 

 

Meanwhile, she said studies have also shown that family planning programs are more efficient in helping cut emissions, citing research by Thomas Wire of London School of Economics that states: “Each $7 spent on basic family planning would reduce CO2 emissions by more than one ton” whereas it would cost $13 for reduced deforestation, $24 to use wind technology, $51 for solar power, $93 for introducing hybrid cars and $131 for electric vehicles."

 

 

Zhao admitted that China’s population program is not without consequences, as the country is entering the aging society fast and facing the problem of gender imbalance.

 

 

Whether, and, if so, how, population control should be an active part of a country’s climate control is certainly a difficult political and cultural issue – but one that fast-growing economies such as China, India, and Brazil may have to face in the coming years.

China Points To Population Control As Climate Change Strategy

Posted on July 26, 2010 by Stephen E. Herrmann

The population issue has not received much comment when countries discuss ways to mitigate climate change and slow down global warming, according to Zhao Baige, Vice Minister of National Population and Family Planning Commission of China (NPFPC).

 

 

“Dealing with climate change is not simply an issue of CO2 emission reduction but a comprehensive challenge involving political, economic, social, cultural and ecological issues, and the population concern fits right into the picture,” said Zhao.

 

 

Zhao cites studies that link population growth with emissions and the effect of climate change, saying:

 

“Calculations of the contribution of population growth to emissions growth globally produce a consistent finding that most of past population growth has been responsible for between 40 percent and 60 percent of emissions growth,” citing the 2009 State of World Population report, released earlier by the UN Population Fund.

 

 

Although China’s family planning policy has received criticism over the past three decades, Zhao said that China’s population program has made a great historic contribution to the well-being of China’s society.

 

 

As a result of the family planning policy, China has seen 400 million fewer births, which has resulted in 18 million fewer tons of CO2 emissions a year, Zhao said. The UN report projected that if the global population would remain 8 billion by the year 2050 instead of a little more than 9 billion according to medium-growth scenario, “it might result in 1 billion to 2 billion fewer tons of carbon emissions.”

 

 

Meanwhile, she said studies have also shown that family planning programs are more efficient in helping cut emissions, citing research by Thomas Wire of London School of Economics that states: “Each $7 spent on basic family planning would reduce CO2 emissions by more than one ton” whereas it would cost $13 for reduced deforestation, $24 to use wind technology, $51 for solar power, $93 for introducing hybrid cars and $131 for electric vehicles."

 

 

Zhao admitted that China’s population program is not without consequences, as the country is entering the aging society fast and facing the problem of gender imbalance.

 

 

Whether, and, if so, how, population control should be an active part of a country’s climate control is certainly a difficult political and cultural issue – but one that fast-growing economies such as China, India, and Brazil may have to face in the coming years.

WATER MORE VALUABLE THAN OIL NOW? FOR SURE SOMEDAY!

Posted on January 21, 2010 by Stephen E. Herrmann

According to Bloomberg News, the worldwide scarcity of usable water worldwide already has made water more valuable than oil. The Bloomberg World Water Index, which tracks 11 utilities, has returned more to investors every year since 2003 than oil and gas stocks or the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index.

When you want to spot emerging trends, follow the money. Today, many of the world’s leading companies and investors are making big bets on water. Why -- there simply is not enough freshwater to go around, and the situation is expected to get worse before it gets better.

The most essential commodity in the world today is not oil, not natural gas, not even some type of renewable energy. It’s water -- clean, safe, fresh water.

 

TODAY:

In 1992, the United Nations General Assembly designated March 22 as World Water Day. Every year on that date, people worldwide participate in events and programs to raise public awareness about what many believe to be the world’s most serious health issue -- unsafe and inadequate water supplies -- and to promote the conservation and development of global water resources.

 

More than a billion people -- almost one-fifth of the world’s population -- lack access to safe drinking water, and 40 percent lack access to basic sanitation, according to the 2nd UN World Water Development Report.

 

The United Nations estimates that by 2050 more than two billion people in 48 countries will lack sufficient water. Approximately 97 percent to 98 percent of the water on planet Earth is saltwater (the estimates vary slightly depending on the source). Much of the remaining freshwater is frozen in glaciers or the polar ice caps. Lakes, rivers and groundwater account for about 1 percent of the world’s potentially usable freshwater.

 

According to the United Nations, which has declared 2005-2015 the “Water for Life” decade, 95 percent of the world’s cities still dump raw sewage into their water supplies. Thus it should come as no surprise to know that 80 percent of all the health maladies in developing countries can be traced back to unsanitary water. The global water crisis is the leading cause of death and disease in the world, taking the lives of more than 14,000 people each day, 11,000 of them children under age 5.

 

TOMORROW:

 

If global warming continues to melt glaciers in the polar regions, as expected, the supply of freshwater may actually decrease. First, freshwater from the melting glaciers will mingle with saltwater in the oceans and become too salty to drink. Second, the increased ocean volume will cause sea levels to rise, contaminating freshwater sources along coastal regions with seawater.

 

Sandra Postel, author of the 1998 book, Last Oasis: Facing Water Scarcity, predicts big water availability problems as populations of so-called “water-stressed” countries jump perhaps six fold over the next 30 years. “It raises tons of issues about water and agriculture, growing enough food, providing for all the material needs that people demand as incomes increase, and providing drinking water,” says Postel.

 

Developed countries are not immune to freshwater problems either. Researchers found a six-fold increase in water use for only a two-fold increase in population size in the United States since 1900. Such a trend reflects the connection between higher living standards and increased water usage, and underscores the need for more sustainable management and use of water supplies even in more developed societies. Further evidence of the coming issue with water is that while China is home to 20 percent of the world’s people, only 7 percent of the planet’s freshwater supply is located there.

 

THE PATH:

 

With world population expected to pass nine billion by mid-century, solutions to water scarcity problems are not going to come easy. Some have suggested that technology -- such as large-scale saltwater desalination plants -- could generate more freshwater for the world to use. But environmentalists argue that depleting ocean water is no answer and will only create other serious problems. 

 

The cost of water is usually set by government agencies and local regulators. Water is not traded on commodity exchanges, but many utilities stocks are publicly traded. Meanwhile, investments in companies that provide desalinization, and other processes and technologies that may increase the world’s supply of freshwater, are growing rapidly. General Electric Chairman Jeffrey Immelt said the scarcity of clean water around the world will more than double GE’s revenue from water purification and treatment by 2010 -- to a total of $5 billion. GE’s strategy is for its water division to invest in desalinization and purification in countries that have a shortage of freshwater. Research and development into improving desalination technologies is ongoing, especially in Saudi Arabia, Israel and Japan. And already an estimated 11,000 desalination plants exist in some 120 countries around the world.

 

As individuals, we can all reign in our own water use to help conserve what is becoming an ever more precious resource. We can hold off on watering our lawns in times of drought. And when it does rain, we can gather gutter water in barrels to feed garden hoses and sprinklers. We can turn off the faucet while we brush our teeth or shave, and take shorter showers. As Sandra Postel concludes, “Doing more with less is the first and easiest step along the path toward water security.”

GLOBAL WARMING: PROBABLY AN INCREMENTAL SUCCESS STORY

Posted on July 31, 2009 by Stephen E. Herrmann

On July 8, 2009, at the meeting of G8 world leaders, the United States agreed to a benchmark to limit climate change. It joined some other industrialized countries by agreeing that the globe should not warm up more than 2º Celsius (that is 3.6º Fahrenheit). A limit of 2º Celsius arose out of a scientific consensus. Scientists assembled by the United Nations in 2007 said that the world could face significant dangers if we warmed it up more than 2º Celsius. But David Archer at the University of Chicago said that it’s not a hard and fast danger point, more of a judgment call.

 

The results left some Western leaders cheering. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown called the group’s statement a “historic agreement.” Germany Chancellor Angela Merkel said it was “a clear step forward.” However, White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs was a little less definite, saying: “I think in many ways success for us is going to be getting something through Congress and to [the President’s] desk. It puts in place a system, a market-base system, that lessens the amount of greenhouse gases in the air. Look, that’s going to be the true measure of things.” 

So what was agreed to on July 8? Michael Forman, Obama’s chief negotiator at the Summit said: [The G8 countries] pledged to confront the challenges of climate change and committed to seek an ambitious global agreement. They agreed to join with other countries to achieve a 50% reduction in global emission by 2050 and a goal of 80% reduction by developed countries by 2050.” 

 

But, we should realize that there is a hitch. The 50%and 80% reductions do not refer to the same starting number. The language in the G8 declaration is that there will be an 80% reduction from 1990 or later years. In other words, nations could pick their own starting point. In the United States, emissions have increased nearly 16% since 1990 so there is quite a bite of room in deciding where to start. Also, much of the world’s population is in non-G8 countries. China, India, Mexico and Brazil feel the better-established nations are not doing enough in the short term. They also worry that major reduction commitments on their parts, even if below the 80% target of rich nations, would hamper their economic growth.

 

But, it would certainly appear that the G8 accord is probably an incremental success. Until now, the United States has resisted embracing a target because it implied a commitment to dramatically change the way the world generates electricity, fuels its cars and builds its houses. The long range goals over the coming decades may be easier to agree upon when what the short-term action should be to start moving in the right direction. We all need to hope for the best.

 

UNITED STATES NEEDS TO GET ON BOARD IN 2009 WITH THE ONE-WATT INITIATIVE

Posted on February 9, 2009 by Stephen E. Herrmann

TAKE ACTION ON PHANTOM LOADS:

 

The One-Watt Initiative is a fairly simple regulatory program proposed for eliminating unnecessary electricity losses from electronic equipment in standby mode, known as phantom loads. The European Union, Canada, Korea, Japan and China have all taken action. The United States needs to step up to action through the federal government or the states. President Obama's administration should be urged by all of us to adopt a policy in 2009. Because of the diverse pressures on the Federal government, simultaneous pressure should be exerted on all states to adopt the One-Watt policy.

 

WHAT IS THE STANDBY POWER PROBLEM:

Chances are that even environmental lawyers ignore the high energy costs of “phantom load.” But, now is the time to get regulation started.

Phantom load is the electricity consumed by a device when it is turned OFF.[1] Devices that have a phantom load are sometimes referred to as “vampires.”   For example, a television consumes electricity as it waits for the “on” button on the remote to be hit. Heavy phantom load users include the “power brick” adaptors that charge or operate cell phones, laptop computers, cordless drills, answering machines, radios, incheck printers and many other residential devices. These adapters are actually small transfers, turning AC electricity from the wall outlet into the DC electricity for use by the device. While one of these devices may only consume a small amount of power (e.g., 3-20 watts), a dozen or so of them running simultaneously and continuously, consume a significant amount of energy. What is worse is that even when not charging the cell phone or the battery for the cordless drill, that AC adapter may continue to consume power just because it is plugged into the wall.

 

HOW LARGE IS THE PHANTOM LOAD:

In the United States, the phantom load make up about six percent of the total, and around ten percent of residential consumption. 

As the United States Department of Energy stated: 

“Many appliances continue to draw a small of power when they are switched off. These “phantom” loads occur in most appliances that use electricity, such as VCRs, televisions, stereos, computers and kitchen appliances. In the average home, 75% of electricity used to power home electronics is consumed while the products are turned off. This can be avoided by unplugging the appliance or using the power strip and using the switch on the power strip to cut all power to the appliance.”

The British Government’s 2006 Energy Review found that standby modes on electric devices accounted for 8% of all British domestic power consumption. A similar study in France in 2000 found that standby power accounted for 7% of total residential consumption. Further studies have come to similar conclusions in other developed countries, including the Netherlands, Australia and Japan. Some countries estimates the proportion of consumption due to standby power as high as 13% in some countries. 

 

one-watt initiative:

The One-Watt Initiative is an energy saving proposal by the International Energy Agency to reduce standby power in all appliances to just one watt. The One-Watt Initiative was launched by the IEA in 1999 to promote, through international cooperation, that by 2010, all new appliances sold in the world would only use one watt in standby mode. On July, 2005, at the Gleneagles Summit in Scotland, the G8 countries signed an endorsement to, among other things, "promote the application of the IEA's 1 Watt Initiative". It is estimated that, if implemented, leaking electricity would be cut by as much as 75% when the existing stock of appliances is replaced. Further savings would occur as the number of vampire appliances increase.

 

INTERNATIONAL PROGRESS ON THE ONE-WATT PLAN:

An international group of experts was assembled to define standby power and establish a common test procedure. An internationally sanctioned definition and test procedure was adopted by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62301).

On January 9, 2009, the European Commission adopted a regulation laying down energy efficiency requirements, which is intended to cut the standby electricity consumption by almost 75% by 2020. As of 2010, the standby power consumption of new products has to be less than one watt or two watts. These values will be lowered in 2013 to 0.5 watt and one watt, which is close to the levels achievable with the best available technology.

NR Canada by Regulation is proposing that the Tier 1 energy efficiency performance standards for certain standby power will apply to products manufactured after June 1, 2009. The effective date for the Tier 2 standards will be applied to products manufactured after June 1, 2011.

Both South Korea and Australia have introduced the one watt benchmark in all new electrical devices, and according to the IEA, other countries, notably Japan and China, have undertaken “strong measures” to reduce standby power use. 

 

one-watt initiative in the united states:

So far the United States government's only action has been Executive Order 13221 signed by President George W. Bush in 2001. The Executive Committee states that every governmental agency “when it purchases commercially-available, off-the-shelf products that use external standby power devices, or that contain an internal standby power function, shall purchase products that use no more than one watt in a standby power-consuming mode.”

The State of California currently has an Appliance Efficiency Regulation which includes standby power limits for three consumer audio and video equipment categories (compact audio products, televisions and DVD players and recorders). A few other states have announced intentions to follow the California regulations for standby power limits but have not done so.

 

CONCLUSION:

This is an excellent issue to be pushed by any environmental group or generally concerned citizens. With the backing it has internationally, lobbying should garner little resistance. The United States or individual states should take action in 2009.



[1] There are issues about a definition for standby power. However, for purposes of general regulations, standby power is the lowest level of electricity consumed by appliances, which cannot be switched off (influenced) by the user, and may persist for an indefinite time when an appliance is connected to its main electricity supply.

UNITED STATES NEEDS TO GET ON BOARD IN 2009 WITH THE ONE-WATT INITIATIVE

Posted on February 9, 2009 by Stephen E. Herrmann

TAKE ACTION ON PHANTOM LOADS:

 

The One-Watt Initiative is a fairly simple regulatory program proposed for eliminating unnecessary electricity losses from electronic equipment in standby mode, known as phantom loads. The European Union, Canada, Korea, Japan and China have all taken action. The United States needs to step up to action through the federal government or the states. President Obama's administration should be urged by all of us to adopt a policy in 2009. Because of the diverse pressures on the Federal government, simultaneous pressure should be exerted on all states to adopt the One-Watt policy.

 

WHAT IS THE STANDBY POWER PROBLEM:

Chances are that even environmental lawyers ignore the high energy costs of “phantom load.” But, now is the time to get regulation started.

Phantom load is the electricity consumed by a device when it is turned OFF.[1] Devices that have a phantom load are sometimes referred to as “vampires.”   For example, a television consumes electricity as it waits for the “on” button on the remote to be hit. Heavy phantom load users include the “power brick” adaptors that charge or operate cell phones, laptop computers, cordless drills, answering machines, radios, incheck printers and many other residential devices. These adapters are actually small transfers, turning AC electricity from the wall outlet into the DC electricity for use by the device. While one of these devices may only consume a small amount of power (e.g., 3-20 watts), a dozen or so of them running simultaneously and continuously, consume a significant amount of energy. What is worse is that even when not charging the cell phone or the battery for the cordless drill, that AC adapter may continue to consume power just because it is plugged into the wall.

 

HOW LARGE IS THE PHANTOM LOAD:

In the United States, the phantom load make up about six percent of the total, and around ten percent of residential consumption. 

As the United States Department of Energy stated: 

“Many appliances continue to draw a small of power when they are switched off. These “phantom” loads occur in most appliances that use electricity, such as VCRs, televisions, stereos, computers and kitchen appliances. In the average home, 75% of electricity used to power home electronics is consumed while the products are turned off. This can be avoided by unplugging the appliance or using the power strip and using the switch on the power strip to cut all power to the appliance.”

The British Government’s 2006 Energy Review found that standby modes on electric devices accounted for 8% of all British domestic power consumption. A similar study in France in 2000 found that standby power accounted for 7% of total residential consumption. Further studies have come to similar conclusions in other developed countries, including the Netherlands, Australia and Japan. Some countries estimates the proportion of consumption due to standby power as high as 13% in some countries. 

 

one-watt initiative:

The One-Watt Initiative is an energy saving proposal by the International Energy Agency to reduce standby power in all appliances to just one watt. The One-Watt Initiative was launched by the IEA in 1999 to promote, through international cooperation, that by 2010, all new appliances sold in the world would only use one watt in standby mode. On July, 2005, at the Gleneagles Summit in Scotland, the G8 countries signed an endorsement to, among other things, "promote the application of the IEA's 1 Watt Initiative". It is estimated that, if implemented, leaking electricity would be cut by as much as 75% when the existing stock of appliances is replaced. Further savings would occur as the number of vampire appliances increase.

 

INTERNATIONAL PROGRESS ON THE ONE-WATT PLAN:

An international group of experts was assembled to define standby power and establish a common test procedure. An internationally sanctioned definition and test procedure was adopted by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62301).

On January 9, 2009, the European Commission adopted a regulation laying down energy efficiency requirements, which is intended to cut the standby electricity consumption by almost 75% by 2020. As of 2010, the standby power consumption of new products has to be less than one watt or two watts. These values will be lowered in 2013 to 0.5 watt and one watt, which is close to the levels achievable with the best available technology.

NR Canada by Regulation is proposing that the Tier 1 energy efficiency performance standards for certain standby power will apply to products manufactured after June 1, 2009. The effective date for the Tier 2 standards will be applied to products manufactured after June 1, 2011.

Both South Korea and Australia have introduced the one watt benchmark in all new electrical devices, and according to the IEA, other countries, notably Japan and China, have undertaken “strong measures” to reduce standby power use. 

 

one-watt initiative in the united states:

So far the United States government's only action has been Executive Order 13221 signed by President George W. Bush in 2001. The Executive Committee states that every governmental agency “when it purchases commercially-available, off-the-shelf products that use external standby power devices, or that contain an internal standby power function, shall purchase products that use no more than one watt in a standby power-consuming mode.”

The State of California currently has an Appliance Efficiency Regulation which includes standby power limits for three consumer audio and video equipment categories (compact audio products, televisions and DVD players and recorders). A few other states have announced intentions to follow the California regulations for standby power limits but have not done so.

 

CONCLUSION:

This is an excellent issue to be pushed by any environmental group or generally concerned citizens. With the backing it has internationally, lobbying should garner little resistance. The United States or individual states should take action in 2009.



[1] There are issues about a definition for standby power. However, for purposes of general regulations, standby power is the lowest level of electricity consumed by appliances, which cannot be switched off (influenced) by the user, and may persist for an indefinite time when an appliance is connected to its main electricity supply.