Enough Is Enough!

Posted on July 3, 2013 by Michael McCauley

On June 13, 2013, U.S. EPA announced its enforcement priorities for the next three years. Among other things, the Agency decided to continue its ill-fated, 15-year old "New Source Review (NSR) Enforcement Initiative."  This effort has targeted coal-fired power plants and other large manufacturing facilities for alleged violations of the Clean Air Act.  The allegations often pertain to projects which were implemented over twenty and thirty years ago.

Not surprisingly, EPA has not fared very well in the courts with cases like this.  The Agency has run into problems, including:  1) statute of limitations concerning projects completed more than five years before legal action has been commenced; 2) successor liability issues when the current owner/operator of a facility did not own or operate the facility when a targeted project was undertaken; and 3) serious evidentiary questions as to whether a decades-old project caused the requisite actual air emissions increase which triggers the requirements for NSR review under the Clean Air Act.  See generally "EPA's Utility Enforcement Initiative: The MetED Decision May Pose Problems for Plaintiffs," BNA Daily Environment Report, June 13, 2013; U.S. v. Midwest Generation, LLC, 694 F. Supp. 2d 999 (N.D. Ill. 2010), appeal pending in 7th Circuit Court of Appeals.

A recent notice of violation illustrates some of the unfairness and waste of resources connected with EPA's NSR Enforcement Initiative.  EPA issued the notice in 2012.  It alleged a number of NSR violations against the owner/operator of a manufacturing facility (not a utility).  One of the allegations pertained to a change made at that facility in 1982.  Since 1982, the ownership of the facility has changed four times.  The current owner has been targeted in EPA's enforcement action.  Records regarding the 1982 project are scant, and the personnel involved in the work in 1982 are all either long-retired or deceased.

To make matters worse, EPA had received the available information about the 1982 project in 1999 from the party who owned the facility at that time.  This was done in response to a Section 114 Information Request issued by EPA.  That owner heard nothing further from EPA about any of the projects covered in the 1999 inquiry.

In 2011, EPA issued a new Section 114 Information Request to the current owner who had acquired the facility in 2006.  The request covered projects that occurred after 1999, but it also covered projects which were done prior to 1999, including the 1982 project discussed above.

A reasonable person could ask:  1) Why did EPA wait for 13 years to allege a NSR violation regarding the 1982 project when the Agency was given information about it in 1999?  2) Why is EPA taking action now on a change made at the facility over thirty years ago?  3)  Why is EPA targeting the owner who acquired the facility in 2006 -- some seven years after EPA was first given information about the 1982 project?  4)  Has EPA considered that the current owner/operator of the facility is four times removed from the owner/operator who implemented the change in 1982?

Substantial amounts of money and countless hours of valuable employee time have been expended by the current owner in dealing with EPA on this case.  Both the money and the time could have been better utilized in helping to keep the facility competitive in a very challenging global marketplace.

EPA should consider whether the continuation of the NSR Enforcement Initiative is justified with respect to projects that occurred decades ago.  With most of these cases, fair-minded decision-makers at EPA will find that "Enough is Enough!"