CROSSWORD PUZZLE FOR SEVEN STATES SUBJECT TO REGIONAL EMPHASIS PROGRAM FOR A NEW AGRICULTURAL SAFETY INITIATIVE

Posted on October 11, 2018 by Brian Rosenthal

To address the concerns for worker exposure to potentially hazardous gases and chemicals commonly used in agricultural operations, a federal agency, will provide a three (3) month period of education beginning October 1, 2018. Enforcement is then scheduled to follow through September 30, 2019. According to the agency, workers in this industry face hazards that include fire, explosions, and exposure to toxic gases and hazardous chemicals. Work the Crossword to discover the seven states subject to a new Regional Emphasis Program targeting the fertilizer storage, mixing/blending, and distribution industry in those states.

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Options For Improving Chemical Facility Safety And Security

Posted on February 26, 2014 by Ronald R. Janke

A working group of federal agencies has issued a preliminary list of options for improving chemical facility safety and security for public comment by March 31, 2014. This document implements Section 6(a) of Executive Order 13650, which was issued on August 1, 2013, in response to the explosions at a fertilizer plant in West, Texas. These options for changes in policies, regulations, and standards for chemical facility safety and security are potentially the most far-reaching actions triggered by this Executive Order, which has received renewed attention due to the recent drinking water contamination in West Virginia that was caused by a leak from a chemical storage facility.

The working group lists 49 distinct options, which are each presented as questions, for public input. A number of the options are applicable to specific chemicals, namely ammonium nitrate and other explosives.  A few options specifically apply to oil and gas facilities. Most options, however, broadly deal with chemical safety and security within industry in general. This last category of options addresses issues relating to process safety, regulatory coverage of additional hazardous chemicals, chemical reactivity standards, security at chemical facilities and identifying regulated facilities.

These options raise many important and thought-provoking issues.  Here are a few examples. Can overlapping chemical safety and security programs of two or more agencies be harmonized? Should being subject to one regulatory program, such as the OSHA process safety management, automatically mandate coverage under another program, such as EPA’s risk management program? Should agencies use rulemaking, policies or guidance to effectuate chemical facility safety and security improvements? How can agencies work with private consensus standard organizations in this area? Can strategies, such as greater worker involvement, root-cause analysis or the use of leading indicators, improve safety and security at chemical facilities? While focusing on the front-page accidents can help answer these issues, attention to successful models of chemical facility safety and security is a more reliable guide to identifying useful improvements.